The Quayside

VISION OF THE QUAY

InterContinental Saiboo Street.JPG
 

REDISCOVER ROBERTSON QUAY

The project comprises a luxurious 5-Star InterContinental hotel, along with the Quayside retail podium. The development plan balances Robertson Quay's iconic waterfront location with its unique ability to provide a much-needed community anchor for the rapidly growing residential population.

The Robertson Quay Project will feature a contemporary design, conceptualised by award-winning architecture firm, SCDA Architects; their industrial chic approach resonates with the surrounding landscape and target audience. The new Robertson Quay is designed to re-focus on the food and beverage outlets towards the river, with the river promenade re-imagined with lush resort landscape features.

InterContinental Robertson Quay and Quayside will create an unparalleled experience and become Singapore's most vibrant F&B retail and lifestyle destination.

--

The feel of the ground floor outlets and lobby projects a modern industrial vibe in response to the warehouse references by the river".

 
 

EST

2001


 

 

PRESERVING THE PAST

RB CAPITAL WILL REVITALISE THE QUAY WITH AN ELEGANT LUXURY INTERCONTINENTAL HOTEL AND REFRESH THE QUAYSIDE, MAINTAINING ITS HISTORY AND SENSE OF PLACE. 

In the 1890s, the land up-stream of today’s Clarke Quay was undeveloped-- As a result of rapid growth in trade and population of the settlement of Singapore, development spread upstream along the Singapore River.

The tidal swamps were reclaimed in the 19th century to cater to demand for the warehousing of goods that came through Singapore.

By the beginning of the 20th century, buildings catering to our entrepot trade were built at Robertson Quay.

By early 1930s, these areas were fully developed with warehouses – commonly known as ‘godowns’, while the river itself was filled with bumboats that brought goods in and out of Singapore via the river and harbour.

After the area was zoned for residential, hotel and commercial uses in the 1990s, most of the godowns were been demolished. 

******These early industrial buildings along Singapore River played an important role in the early stages of Singapore’s development. Raffles specifically chose Singapore to serve as a centre for the entrepot trade between India and China, and the Singapore River was the natural location for trade to be carried out due to its sheltered waters.

Shophouses and godowns were a necessary part of this trading infrastructure as goods that were taken from ships in Singapore Harbour had to be stored until the trade winds were blowing in the right direction for other ships to take them to their ultimate destination. These buildings were also where goods were stored for redistribution up into, or collected from peninsular Malaya.

The increasingly lucrative trade drove the building and rebuilding of godowns along the River from the mid 1800s until the late 1970s when trade and warehousing was phased out along the River as urban renewal took place.

These former industrial buildings illustrate the role and importance of trade in the development of our city. Their construction styles and techniques are evidence of how building in Singapore has been influenced by cultures and change from around the world. Their continued presence, together with the other buildings already conserved at Boat Quay, Clarke Quay and Riverside Village, provides a window into the style and taste of the past . Integrated into newer developments, they provide a historic layer to an ever evolving Singapore River. As part of the whole river, they form an important link to our history and showcase how Singapore has been built up into a port of international standing over a span of 2 centuries.

 
 

EST

2001


 

 

CONNECTING THE COMMUNITY

TO THE WATERFRONT

In the 1970s, squatters, hawkers and manufacturing industries crowded the banks of the river, leading to severe pollution. The Government mounted a $170 million clean-up, with enhancements over the years, forming the vibrant waterway that we know today.